Title

Analog Modeling of "Thick-skin" Crustal Deformation during Continental Collision

Presenter Information

Justin Clinton

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geology and Geophysics

Research Advisor

Chandonia, William J.

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Abstract

We use analog modeling to investigate the role of rigid basement rock in altering the architecture of fold and thrust belts that form in the overlying sedimentary "cover" rock during Plate Tectonic related continental collisions. The results will elucidate how “thick-skinned” deformation (basement-involvement) affects development of “structural traps” in the cover rocks. Such traps commonly are sites of prolific accumulation of hydrocarbons and are targets for energy industries. The model consists of layered colored sand (sedimentary cover) resting on a wooden block (rigid basement rocks). Saw cuts in the “basement” represent preexisting faults that reactivate during deformation. Shortening (e.g., horizontal compression) of the cover-rocks and basement-rocks during continental collision is accomplished by advancing a rigid wall (i.e., the colliding continent). Data to be collected includes thrust fault number, spacing, and geometry. Comparisons will be made to cross sections of thick-skinned deformation associated with the Appalachian fold and thrust belt.

Biography

Justin Clinton was born in Maryland Heights in St. Louis, Missouri. He moved to Rolla when he was 4 yrs old and graduated from Rolla High School in 2008 with an A+ scholarship. He took his core college classes at East Central College and then transferred to Missouri University of Science and Technology to pursue a degree in geology and geophysics. Justin became interested in geology and geophysics when he was about 8 yrs old. It started when he received box of all the minerals of every state and the interest in how they formed and why there were only found in certain areas and not everywhere. While growing up, he was fortunate enough to have several family friends who were geologists from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, the US Geological Survey, and Conoco that he was able to talk to. Justin is interested in geophysics and plans to work in the engineering geophysics field after graduating.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Research proposal poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Analog Modeling of "Thick-skin" Crustal Deformation during Continental Collision

Upper Atrium/Hallway

We use analog modeling to investigate the role of rigid basement rock in altering the architecture of fold and thrust belts that form in the overlying sedimentary "cover" rock during Plate Tectonic related continental collisions. The results will elucidate how “thick-skinned” deformation (basement-involvement) affects development of “structural traps” in the cover rocks. Such traps commonly are sites of prolific accumulation of hydrocarbons and are targets for energy industries. The model consists of layered colored sand (sedimentary cover) resting on a wooden block (rigid basement rocks). Saw cuts in the “basement” represent preexisting faults that reactivate during deformation. Shortening (e.g., horizontal compression) of the cover-rocks and basement-rocks during continental collision is accomplished by advancing a rigid wall (i.e., the colliding continent). Data to be collected includes thrust fault number, spacing, and geometry. Comparisons will be made to cross sections of thick-skinned deformation associated with the Appalachian fold and thrust belt.