Title

2-D Seismic analysis of polygonal fault systems of Khoman Formation, Western Desert, Egypt

Presenter Information

Yuchen Yang

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geology and Geophysics

Research Advisor

Liu, Kelly H.

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

National Science Foundation (U.S.)

Abstract

Throughout the Khoman Formation near the Farafra Oasis, Egypt, a series of basins called desert eyes are thought to be the result of a system of subsurface polygonal faults. The research area spans four specific locations in which seismic data was gathered using both forward and reverse 2-D refraction surveys. The area of interest consists predominantly of Cretaceous chalk deposits, in which extensive faulting and desert eye structures can be observed on the surface. The research aims at locating faults along with their respective vertical throw, and potentially recognizing desert eye structures in seismic section. Correlation of the subsurface data to visible faults on the surface and understanding seismic refraction techniques will allow accurate identification of desert eye structures that may no longer be visible due to eolian deposition.

Biography

Yuchen Yang is an undergraduate student and majoring in Geology and Geophysics. His interest is Geophysics with emphasis on Seismic Interpretation. He plans to attend graduate school upon graduation in May 2017.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint Project with Vanessa Reynolds and Dylan Webb

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

2-D Seismic analysis of polygonal fault systems of Khoman Formation, Western Desert, Egypt

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Throughout the Khoman Formation near the Farafra Oasis, Egypt, a series of basins called desert eyes are thought to be the result of a system of subsurface polygonal faults. The research area spans four specific locations in which seismic data was gathered using both forward and reverse 2-D refraction surveys. The area of interest consists predominantly of Cretaceous chalk deposits, in which extensive faulting and desert eye structures can be observed on the surface. The research aims at locating faults along with their respective vertical throw, and potentially recognizing desert eye structures in seismic section. Correlation of the subsurface data to visible faults on the surface and understanding seismic refraction techniques will allow accurate identification of desert eye structures that may no longer be visible due to eolian deposition.