Title

The Effects of Increasing the Number of Stimuli Events per Second on Human Visual and Auditory Perception

Presenter Information

Joshua Miller

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Gerald, Rex

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

Self-Funded

Abstract

In this experiment, the abilities of human visual and auditory perception were studied with the use of a Parallax Basic Stamp 2 Microcontroller by measuring 30 test subject’s correct responses when counting the number of flashes of a LED, and/or the number of beeps from a piezoelectric speaker that occur within one second. It was found that humans more accurately perceive sounds and light stimuli simultaneously that then when individually exposed to 1-10 stimuli within the one second time period. The overall average percentage of correct answers for the combined visual and perception test was 61.3% while the subjects of visual perception test gave 60.3% of the correct answers. The least perceived stimulus was the auditory stimulus which resulted in an average 57.4% of the correct responses. A majority of the test subjects were able to perceive the number of events per second with a deviation of plus or minus 1 from the correct number of event per second. Test subjects could perceive 5 events per second with more than 50% accuracy for all perception tests. A highly negative correlation was found between correct responses and the number of stimuli per second.

Biography

Joshua Miller, a Rolla native, is a senior a Missouri S&T majoring in chemistry. His studies in chemistry have had an emphasis in biochemistry. Joshua’s interest in biochemical pathways has also led to research in the physiology of perception pathways. Joshua plans to continue his research in biochemistry after graduation in May of 2015.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:45 AM

The Effects of Increasing the Number of Stimuli Events per Second on Human Visual and Auditory Perception

Upper Atrium/Hall

In this experiment, the abilities of human visual and auditory perception were studied with the use of a Parallax Basic Stamp 2 Microcontroller by measuring 30 test subject’s correct responses when counting the number of flashes of a LED, and/or the number of beeps from a piezoelectric speaker that occur within one second. It was found that humans more accurately perceive sounds and light stimuli simultaneously that then when individually exposed to 1-10 stimuli within the one second time period. The overall average percentage of correct answers for the combined visual and perception test was 61.3% while the subjects of visual perception test gave 60.3% of the correct answers. The least perceived stimulus was the auditory stimulus which resulted in an average 57.4% of the correct responses. A majority of the test subjects were able to perceive the number of events per second with a deviation of plus or minus 1 from the correct number of event per second. Test subjects could perceive 5 events per second with more than 50% accuracy for all perception tests. A highly negative correlation was found between correct responses and the number of stimuli per second.