Title

Testing of Active Compressions-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Presenter Information

Elizabeth Robinson

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Ceramic Engineering

Research Advisor

Pernicka, Hank

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

AMAE Grant; STUCO

Abstract

An Active-Compression-Decompression (ACD) device was tested to assess the benefits of ACD-CPR during cardiac arrest. The first portion of the experiment illustrated the feasibility of an average person performing ACD-CPR in microgravity. The second portion of the experiment used a fluids model of the human chest to compare the flow rate of the heart in both 1g and microgravity using ACD-CPR and traditional CPR. The results of this experiment showed that ACD-CPR through a behind-the-back application could be initiated within 25 seconds and that an average rate of 96 compressions per minute could be achieved in microgravity. It was shown that ACD-CPR improved cardiac output by 23% during microgravity as compared to 44% in a 1g environment. Data showed that both ACD-CPR and traditional CPR were more effective in microgravity as compared to a 1g environment.

Biography

Elizabeth is a sophomore studying Ceramic Engineering in the Material Sciences and Engineering department. She is the vice president of Miners in Space, a Missouri S&T design team that partners with NASA to perform microgravity research on the Weightless Wonder, aka the Vomit Comet. She is also involved in Keramos, the ceramic engineering professional fraternity, and will be Herald for the organization in the upcoming school year. Elizabeth is also a member of the S&T Women’s Track and Field Team, receiving an All-Academic honor for the 2013-2014 season. She is looking forward to an internship with GE Aviation this summer.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Engineering oral presentation, Third place

Location

St. Pat's B

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

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Apr 15th, 2:00 PM Apr 15th, 2:30 PM

Testing of Active Compressions-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

St. Pat's B

An Active-Compression-Decompression (ACD) device was tested to assess the benefits of ACD-CPR during cardiac arrest. The first portion of the experiment illustrated the feasibility of an average person performing ACD-CPR in microgravity. The second portion of the experiment used a fluids model of the human chest to compare the flow rate of the heart in both 1g and microgravity using ACD-CPR and traditional CPR. The results of this experiment showed that ACD-CPR through a behind-the-back application could be initiated within 25 seconds and that an average rate of 96 compressions per minute could be achieved in microgravity. It was shown that ACD-CPR improved cardiac output by 23% during microgravity as compared to 44% in a 1g environment. Data showed that both ACD-CPR and traditional CPR were more effective in microgravity as compared to a 1g environment.