Title

Flashing Light Patterns and the Resulting Effect on Heart Rate

Presenter Information

Kirsten Kelly

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry Pre-med

Research Advisor

Gerald, Rex

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Abstract

Heart rate was thought to increase while watching a series of flashing lights. Fourteen different peoples’ heart rates were individually observed in after being given a Vernier Labpro heart rate monitor. Their heart rates were observed and recorded while the people stared at several different light patterns. The light patterns included a yellow flashing pattern, a red flashing pattern, and an alternating red and yellow flashing pattern. The flashing patterns were controlled by a BS2 Stamp microcontroller. A statistical analysis was done comparing the heart rates within each flashing light pattern set. The data suggests that focusing on a singular task decreased heart rate.

Biography

Kirsten Kelly is a Junior in the Chemistry Pre-med program at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She will be graduating in May 2016.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:45 AM

Flashing Light Patterns and the Resulting Effect on Heart Rate

Upper Atrium/Hall

Heart rate was thought to increase while watching a series of flashing lights. Fourteen different peoples’ heart rates were individually observed in after being given a Vernier Labpro heart rate monitor. Their heart rates were observed and recorded while the people stared at several different light patterns. The light patterns included a yellow flashing pattern, a red flashing pattern, and an alternating red and yellow flashing pattern. The flashing patterns were controlled by a BS2 Stamp microcontroller. A statistical analysis was done comparing the heart rates within each flashing light pattern set. The data suggests that focusing on a singular task decreased heart rate.