Title

Making a Plasma Laboratory for Missouri S&T Students

Presenter Information

Monica Gehrig

Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Major

Nuclear Engineering

Research Advisor

Castano, Carlos H.

Advisor's Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Funding Source

Department funds; OURE Stipend

Abstract

Plasma is a quasi-neutral gas consisting of both charged and neutral particles that exhibit collective behavior. This unique fluid can be used in many applications, including but not limited to space propulsion, gaseous electronics, and fusion projects. One method to produce plasma is to apply a high voltage to a gas in a vacuum chamber. If the plasma is produced in a transparent vacuum chamber, it can be analyzed with the assistance of concepts that are offered at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in the Plasma I course available annually.

This project aims to create a counterpart to the Plasma I course; it provides an introduction to physical interaction and understanding of the fluid. This is being tested via the use of placed electrodes applying variable voltage to Argon at variable pressures. Results will be graphed with respect to pressure and voltage holding electrode distance constant.

Biography

Monica Gehrig is a sophomore in Missouri S&T’s nuclear department. She is interested in pursuing a future in research in development of nuclear energy, which inspired the research she is presenting in this conference.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:45 AM

Making a Plasma Laboratory for Missouri S&T Students

Upper Atrium/Hall

Plasma is a quasi-neutral gas consisting of both charged and neutral particles that exhibit collective behavior. This unique fluid can be used in many applications, including but not limited to space propulsion, gaseous electronics, and fusion projects. One method to produce plasma is to apply a high voltage to a gas in a vacuum chamber. If the plasma is produced in a transparent vacuum chamber, it can be analyzed with the assistance of concepts that are offered at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in the Plasma I course available annually.

This project aims to create a counterpart to the Plasma I course; it provides an introduction to physical interaction and understanding of the fluid. This is being tested via the use of placed electrodes applying variable voltage to Argon at variable pressures. Results will be graphed with respect to pressure and voltage holding electrode distance constant.