Title

Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Beacons

Presenter Information

Adam Evans

Department

Computer Science

Major

Computer Science

Research Advisor

De, Debraj
Das, Sajal K.

Advisor's Department

Computer Science

Funding Source

NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates

Abstract

The importance of the problem of Indoor Localization has grown tremendously as smartphones have become more ubiquitous and robots more intelligent. Solutions to this problem will greatly help users with location-based services indoors, and allow robots to become more autonomous in movement and navigation. Previous attempts have used a multitude of strategies, including signal fingerprinting, online and offline simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), and estimating user location change using phone sensors, commonly the accelerometer, gyroscope, and compass. In our research, we have: (i) characterized various properties of communication between Bluetooth beacons and smartphones (including effects of orientation, distance and environmental condition); (ii) performed user daily activity behavior analysis with Bluetooth beacons (placed in key locations around the Computer Science building); (iii) applied a variation of signal mapping to the collected data for location estimation.

Biography

Adam Evans is a sophomore majoring in Computer Science at Missouri S&T. He has been programming since eighth grade and is a member of ACM SIG-Competition on campus.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:45 AM

Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Beacons

Upper Atrium/Hall

The importance of the problem of Indoor Localization has grown tremendously as smartphones have become more ubiquitous and robots more intelligent. Solutions to this problem will greatly help users with location-based services indoors, and allow robots to become more autonomous in movement and navigation. Previous attempts have used a multitude of strategies, including signal fingerprinting, online and offline simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), and estimating user location change using phone sensors, commonly the accelerometer, gyroscope, and compass. In our research, we have: (i) characterized various properties of communication between Bluetooth beacons and smartphones (including effects of orientation, distance and environmental condition); (ii) performed user daily activity behavior analysis with Bluetooth beacons (placed in key locations around the Computer Science building); (iii) applied a variation of signal mapping to the collected data for location estimation.