Title

Laser Disposition -- Mass Flow Sensor

Presenter Information

George L. Holmes Jr.

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Liou, Frank W.
Sparks, Todd E.

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience

Abstract

3D printing has been able to capture the imagination of many, turning science fiction into reality. A more precocious element of 3D printing enables infinitesimal amounts of metal powder and a high powered laser to fabricate a part. This project is concerned with the designing, optimization and signal analysis of an optical systems to measure the flow rate of the metal powder involved with printing such a part. Implications include increased control during fabrication and a more complex, diverse range of manufacturing capabilities.

Biography

George Holmes is a diverse student that has become engaged on all levels of the undergraduate experience. He is the President of Black Man’s Think Tank, Membership Intake Chair for Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., and student representative for the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee. After graduating in December of 2015 George will pursue a Ph.D. at Missouri S&T. He has ambitions of one day starting his own business in engineering related industries and fostering a passion for engineering in future generations.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

St. Pat's B

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 10:00 am - 10:30 am

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Apr 15th, 10:00 AM Apr 15th, 10:30 AM

Laser Disposition -- Mass Flow Sensor

St. Pat's B

3D printing has been able to capture the imagination of many, turning science fiction into reality. A more precocious element of 3D printing enables infinitesimal amounts of metal powder and a high powered laser to fabricate a part. This project is concerned with the designing, optimization and signal analysis of an optical systems to measure the flow rate of the metal powder involved with printing such a part. Implications include increased control during fabrication and a more complex, diverse range of manufacturing capabilities.