Title

Building Better Soybeans with B. japonicum

Presenter Information

Samantha Huckuntod

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Glycine max, otherwise known as soybean, is the second largest crop in the United States in growing area and sales. It is second only to maize, which is deemed more hardy in drought affected environments than soybean. In order to have higher soybean yields in drought conditions, researchers have suggested manipulating transpiration rates, lateral root length, and nitrogen fixation. Of these, manipulation of soybean nitrogen fixation through its bacterial symbionts show much promise. Because the natural soybean symbionts are not equipped with the proper “tools” for high drought scenarios, synthetic biologists look towards halotolerant bacteria for solutions to low water concentrations. For future research, I propose equipping soybean symbionts with the means to produce ectoine through use of synthetic biology. Ectoine is a compatible solute that aids halotolerant and halophillic bacteria combat stresses in osmolarity. By producing ectoine, I predict soybean symbionts (B. japonicum) will become more drought tolerant.

Biography

Samantha Huckuntod is a junior in Biological Sciences. Her research interests include quorum sensing and signal transduction. She hopes to continue her research interests as a career in the future.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Building Better Soybeans with B. japonicum

Upper Atrium/Hall

Glycine max, otherwise known as soybean, is the second largest crop in the United States in growing area and sales. It is second only to maize, which is deemed more hardy in drought affected environments than soybean. In order to have higher soybean yields in drought conditions, researchers have suggested manipulating transpiration rates, lateral root length, and nitrogen fixation. Of these, manipulation of soybean nitrogen fixation through its bacterial symbionts show much promise. Because the natural soybean symbionts are not equipped with the proper “tools” for high drought scenarios, synthetic biologists look towards halotolerant bacteria for solutions to low water concentrations. For future research, I propose equipping soybean symbionts with the means to produce ectoine through use of synthetic biology. Ectoine is a compatible solute that aids halotolerant and halophillic bacteria combat stresses in osmolarity. By producing ectoine, I predict soybean symbionts (B. japonicum) will become more drought tolerant.