Title

Micro Piezoelectric Windmill

Presenter Information

Therese Galbraith

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Duan, Lian, 1983-

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Abstract

The research aims at developing a novel small-scale piezoelectric windmill that can efficiently harvest energy from natural wind flows by combining computer simulations, wind-tunnel experiments, and field tests. The windmill holds the potential for powering various wireless sensors, including but not limited to those widely used for monitoring structural health, border intrusion, weather conditions, food security. Existing small-scale piezoelectric windmill designs typically have complicated structural motion systems and low output electric power densities (power per PZT volume), and cannot be used for random wind flows coming from arbitrary direction. Our invention is designed to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks of existing windmills. It features simpler structures for the motion system and significantly higher power density compared with the state-of-the-art model in literature. It also has the advantage of being operational with fluid flows coming from arbitrary directions, ideal for harvesting energy from natural random flows.

Biography

Therese Galbraith is a Junior studying Mechanical Engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She plans to co-op with Pella Corporation this summer and next semester working on developing Insynctive technology.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Research proposal poster session, Second place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint Project with Yahya Abu Hijleh

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Micro Piezoelectric Windmill

Upper Atrium/Hall

The research aims at developing a novel small-scale piezoelectric windmill that can efficiently harvest energy from natural wind flows by combining computer simulations, wind-tunnel experiments, and field tests. The windmill holds the potential for powering various wireless sensors, including but not limited to those widely used for monitoring structural health, border intrusion, weather conditions, food security. Existing small-scale piezoelectric windmill designs typically have complicated structural motion systems and low output electric power densities (power per PZT volume), and cannot be used for random wind flows coming from arbitrary direction. Our invention is designed to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks of existing windmills. It features simpler structures for the motion system and significantly higher power density compared with the state-of-the-art model in literature. It also has the advantage of being operational with fluid flows coming from arbitrary directions, ideal for harvesting energy from natural random flows.