Title

Dissolution Rates of a Bio-active Borate Glass in Water

Presenter Information

Angela Grueninger

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Major

Ceramic Engineering

Research Advisor

Brow, Richard K.
George, Jaime

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

National Science Foundation (DMR-1207520)

Abstract

Borate glasses have been developed at Missouri S&T for biomedical applications, but less is known about how these glasses react in aqueous environments than more common silicate bioactive glasses. This research used the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test to study the dissolution rates of a borate bioactive glass with a composition of c53B2O3-20CaO-12K2O-6Na2O-5MgO-4P2O5 (wt%) in deionized water at °C. The SPFT flow rate was kept constant at 15 ml per day and the amount of glass particles in a reaction cell was varied by a factor of 20. Increasing sample size increases the concentration of ions in a reaction cell which in turn influences the dissolution rate. Solution samples were collected throughout the testing period and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) to determine the concentrations of boron, calcium, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium in each sample at the different time periods. The smallest sample (0.05 grams) dissolved completely in 4 days whereas only 71% of the largest sample (1.00 grams) dissolved after 13 days. The slower dissolution rates for larger sample sizes are consistent with the greater ionic strengths of solutions measured by ICP-OES. The ICP-OES data was also used to calculate changes in average particle sizes which decreased with dissolution time for all experimental conditions.

Biography

Angela Grueninger is a senior in Ceramic Engineering. She has been working with Dr. Brow and his research group for one year assisting in and conducting various research experiments on bio-active glass and other glass applications. Angela looks forward to doing more research in the area of bio-active glass and working in this area upon her graduation from Missouri S&T in December 2015.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Dissolution Rates of a Bio-active Borate Glass in Water

Upper Atrium/Hall

Borate glasses have been developed at Missouri S&T for biomedical applications, but less is known about how these glasses react in aqueous environments than more common silicate bioactive glasses. This research used the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test to study the dissolution rates of a borate bioactive glass with a composition of c53B2O3-20CaO-12K2O-6Na2O-5MgO-4P2O5 (wt%) in deionized water at °C. The SPFT flow rate was kept constant at 15 ml per day and the amount of glass particles in a reaction cell was varied by a factor of 20. Increasing sample size increases the concentration of ions in a reaction cell which in turn influences the dissolution rate. Solution samples were collected throughout the testing period and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) to determine the concentrations of boron, calcium, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium in each sample at the different time periods. The smallest sample (0.05 grams) dissolved completely in 4 days whereas only 71% of the largest sample (1.00 grams) dissolved after 13 days. The slower dissolution rates for larger sample sizes are consistent with the greater ionic strengths of solutions measured by ICP-OES. The ICP-OES data was also used to calculate changes in average particle sizes which decreased with dissolution time for all experimental conditions.