Title

Synergetic Health Effects of Radon with Electronic Cigarette Vapor

Presenter Information

Eric D. Carlson

Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Major

Nuclear Engineering

Research Advisor

Castano, Carlos H.
Liu, Xin (Mining & Nuclear Engr)

Advisor's Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Funding Source

OURE Research Fund; New Professor Research Fund (Dr. Xin Liu)

Abstract

The two leading causes of lung cancer in the US are from smoke inhalation (particularly cigarette smoke) and the inhalation of radon gas. Already known from pre-existing research is that there is a synergetic effect between cigarette smoke and radon, causing an increased rate of radon being absorbed by the lungs. This research project deals with determining whether there is a similar synergetic effect between electronic cigarette vapor and radon gas. Results have found no statistically significant synergy between electronic cigarette vapor and radon, while by the same methodology finding a synergy between classical cigarette smoke and radon (62.12 cpm, s = 24.86 cmp).

Biography

Eric D. Carlson is a senior at Missouri S&T pursuing a BS in Nuclear Engineering. He is involved in several on-campus organizations, such as the American Nuclear Society (for which he is the Outreach Chair) and Women in Nuclear. He is actively performing undergraduate research for NE professors Dr. Xin Liu and Dr. Carlos Castano on the radiological health effects of e-cigs, as well as performing research on the effects of thermal aging on friction stir welded copper. He is as well the criticality subgroup lead for his senior design team, responsible for the design of the group’s reactor, team TRUCKERS.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Synergetic Health Effects of Radon with Electronic Cigarette Vapor

Upper Atrium/Hall

The two leading causes of lung cancer in the US are from smoke inhalation (particularly cigarette smoke) and the inhalation of radon gas. Already known from pre-existing research is that there is a synergetic effect between cigarette smoke and radon, causing an increased rate of radon being absorbed by the lungs. This research project deals with determining whether there is a similar synergetic effect between electronic cigarette vapor and radon gas. Results have found no statistically significant synergy between electronic cigarette vapor and radon, while by the same methodology finding a synergy between classical cigarette smoke and radon (62.12 cpm, s = 24.86 cmp).