Title

Marcel Aymé's Wartime Journalism

Presenter Information

Emily Weigel

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Merfeld-Langston, Audra L.

Advisor's Department

Arts, Languages, and Philosophy

Abstract

During World War II, the Germans occupied approximately half of France. This meant many new rules for French citizens, including the rationing of food and censorship of the media. Marcel Aymé was a writer before and during the Occupation of France. His decision to continue writing under German censors caused some people at the time to label him as a collaborator, but after reading Aymé's original newspaper articles published from 1939-1944, it is clear he was in no way pro-German. His articles contain many harsh truths about France's downfall, along with a defense of freedom of speech for writers. After the war, many people condemned Aymé's defense of collaborators' rights to free expression. On the surface, Aymé's works are very critical of the French government and its citizens, but he did this because he wanted to spark discussion and better his country.

Biography

Emily Weigel is a fifth year Chemistry student also studying for her minor in French. She has been an active member of the campus radio station KMNR since her third semester, holding executive board and appointed positions in addition to her regular radio show. When not studying or doing homework, she enjoys reading science fiction and fantasy novels.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Arts and humanities oral presentation, Second place

Location

Meramec Room

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 10:00 am - 10:30 am

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Apr 15th, 10:00 AM Apr 15th, 10:30 AM

Marcel Aymé's Wartime Journalism

Meramec Room

During World War II, the Germans occupied approximately half of France. This meant many new rules for French citizens, including the rationing of food and censorship of the media. Marcel Aymé was a writer before and during the Occupation of France. His decision to continue writing under German censors caused some people at the time to label him as a collaborator, but after reading Aymé's original newspaper articles published from 1939-1944, it is clear he was in no way pro-German. His articles contain many harsh truths about France's downfall, along with a defense of freedom of speech for writers. After the war, many people condemned Aymé's defense of collaborators' rights to free expression. On the surface, Aymé's works are very critical of the French government and its citizens, but he did this because he wanted to spark discussion and better his country.