Title

The Trouble with Lying: An Empirical Study of the Interaction Between Agreeableness, Lie Type, and Counterproductive Workplace Behaviors

Presenter Information

Kelly Payton

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychology

Research Advisor

Weidner, Nathan W.

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Abstract

Research has shown that people will be dishonest until they reach the point where they must update their self-concept (Mazar, Amir, & Ariely, 2008). People justify behaviors (e.g. lying) in their minds to avoid having to think of themselves as dishonest (Mazar et al., 2008). Doing this creates a range of acceptability for dishonest behaviors, like lying. The present study was designed to develop two measures, the Range of Acceptability (ROA) scale and the Propensity for Lying Scale (PLS) in order to better understand how this range of acceptability, with regards to lying, impacts counterproductive workplace behaviors (CWBs). An online questionnaire was administered to examine the relationships between ROA, PLS, Agreeableness, lie type, and CWBs. Range of acceptability, lie type, and propensity for lying were all found to relate to CWBs.

Biography

Kelly Payton is a senior at Missouri S&T. She will be graduating in May with a BS in Psychology. She is a wife, mother of six, and grandmother of two. She is currently working as a Group Facilitator for Southeast Missouri Behavioral Health, and plans to put her psychology degree to use helping people fight their addictions and get their lives back on track.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Social Sciences oral presentation, First place

Location

Meramec Room

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 11:00 am - 11:30 am

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:30 AM

The Trouble with Lying: An Empirical Study of the Interaction Between Agreeableness, Lie Type, and Counterproductive Workplace Behaviors

Meramec Room

Research has shown that people will be dishonest until they reach the point where they must update their self-concept (Mazar, Amir, & Ariely, 2008). People justify behaviors (e.g. lying) in their minds to avoid having to think of themselves as dishonest (Mazar et al., 2008). Doing this creates a range of acceptability for dishonest behaviors, like lying. The present study was designed to develop two measures, the Range of Acceptability (ROA) scale and the Propensity for Lying Scale (PLS) in order to better understand how this range of acceptability, with regards to lying, impacts counterproductive workplace behaviors (CWBs). An online questionnaire was administered to examine the relationships between ROA, PLS, Agreeableness, lie type, and CWBs. Range of acceptability, lie type, and propensity for lying were all found to relate to CWBs.