Title

Causation: Hume’s Concern and Kant’s Response

Presenter Information

Nelson Shreve

Department

Arts, Languages, and Philosophy

Major

Physics; Philosophy

Research Advisor

Dittmer, Joel P.

Advisor's Department

Arts, Languages, and Philosophy

Abstract

If event A occurs then event B will follow. Is causation really that simple? Causation exists only if it is the case that certain events actually cause others. David Hume questioned the assumption of causation in his work A Treatise of Human Nature. This rocked the world of philosophy from its core teachings. Of course, a great question deserves a great response. Immanuel Kant attempted such an answer. Kant argued that a cause necessarily leads to the effect. This is in direct opposition to Hume’s argument that cause probably leads to the effect observed. An example would be of a child jumping into a still pool of water. One would expect that there would be some sort of disturbance of the water. Is this presumption a valid conclusion given the initial conditions? Kant argues that not only does the surface become disturbed, but that it must.

Biography

Nelson is a senior in physics and philosophy. Upon completion of his degree, he plans to attend medical school. In his spare time, he is a tennis instructor.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Arts and humanities oral presentation, First place

Location

Meramec Room

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 9:30 AM Apr 15th, 10:00 AM

Causation: Hume’s Concern and Kant’s Response

Meramec Room

If event A occurs then event B will follow. Is causation really that simple? Causation exists only if it is the case that certain events actually cause others. David Hume questioned the assumption of causation in his work A Treatise of Human Nature. This rocked the world of philosophy from its core teachings. Of course, a great question deserves a great response. Immanuel Kant attempted such an answer. Kant argued that a cause necessarily leads to the effect. This is in direct opposition to Hume’s argument that cause probably leads to the effect observed. An example would be of a child jumping into a still pool of water. One would expect that there would be some sort of disturbance of the water. Is this presumption a valid conclusion given the initial conditions? Kant argues that not only does the surface become disturbed, but that it must.