Title

Antibacterial Properties of Metal Doped Glass

Presenter Information

Rachel Connell

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering; Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

The proposed research is intended to measure the antibacterial properties of novel bioactive glass formulations. Enhancing the antibacterial properties of the glass will improve the effectiveness of the glass and minimize infections. Some of these glasses are being used for bone and tissue repair and have proven effective in stimulating cell growth and repair. The various glasses were tested using well diffusion and water suspension methods. Our research has shown that glass enhanced with different metals is effective at killing diverse bacteria. The doped glass seems to be more effective against Gram-positive compared to Gram-negative bacteria.

Biography

Rachel is a senior in the biological sciences department. Her and Dr. Westenberg work on glass biomaterial. Rachel has been a teaching assistant for Professor Terry Wilson in the Project Lead the Way training program. She plans on attending medical school. She is actively involved in Phi Sigma Biological Honor Society and Scrubs. She is on the University’s basketball team, and she also is involved in the community by volunteer coaching Upward Basketball, refereeing basketball, and tutoring homeschooled children.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Gasconade Room

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:20 pm - 1:40 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:20 PM Apr 15th, 1:40 PM

Antibacterial Properties of Metal Doped Glass

Gasconade Room

The proposed research is intended to measure the antibacterial properties of novel bioactive glass formulations. Enhancing the antibacterial properties of the glass will improve the effectiveness of the glass and minimize infections. Some of these glasses are being used for bone and tissue repair and have proven effective in stimulating cell growth and repair. The various glasses were tested using well diffusion and water suspension methods. Our research has shown that glass enhanced with different metals is effective at killing diverse bacteria. The doped glass seems to be more effective against Gram-positive compared to Gram-negative bacteria.