Title

The Role of Soil Bacteria in Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soils

Presenter Information

John Plihal

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering with an emphasis in Biochemistry

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Dow Chemical Company

Abstract

Bioremediation/phytoremediation are among many methods used to clean up sites contaminated with toxic chemicals. These methods of biodegradation refer to the use of microorganisms/plants to breakdown compounds into smaller molecules that can be volatilized or used by other organisms. Contaminants such as benzene, toluene and catechol are of particular interest in this project. Gram Positive(GP) and Gram negative(GN) bacteria have been identified to excrete enzymes which aid in the degradation of catechol (CAT) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).. More specifically, the biodegradation of benzene, toluene and catechol, among many other compounds, have been linked to the catechol dioxygenase-specific enzymes and PAH-degradation pathways. The enzymes for CAT and PAH degradation have been show to contain a specific DNA sequence which can be amplified by PCR. In this project we used PCR assays dioxygenase to amplify target sequences to quantify the presence of DNA sequences that code for CAT and PAH genes.

Biography

John Plihal is currently a senior in the chemical engineering department at Missouri Science and Technology. He has continued interest in biochemistry, cellular, tissue and enzymatic engineering. At Missouri S&T, John participates in on campus activities such as Student Union Board, intramural soccer along with continued work in ceramics, filtration, and biochemical engineering processes. John started his undergraduate research by participating in the OURE program and intends to further his education in fields related to biochemistry and biochemical engineering.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint project with Cera Thomason

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

The Role of Soil Bacteria in Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soils

Upper Atrium/Hall

Bioremediation/phytoremediation are among many methods used to clean up sites contaminated with toxic chemicals. These methods of biodegradation refer to the use of microorganisms/plants to breakdown compounds into smaller molecules that can be volatilized or used by other organisms. Contaminants such as benzene, toluene and catechol are of particular interest in this project. Gram Positive(GP) and Gram negative(GN) bacteria have been identified to excrete enzymes which aid in the degradation of catechol (CAT) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).. More specifically, the biodegradation of benzene, toluene and catechol, among many other compounds, have been linked to the catechol dioxygenase-specific enzymes and PAH-degradation pathways. The enzymes for CAT and PAH degradation have been show to contain a specific DNA sequence which can be amplified by PCR. In this project we used PCR assays dioxygenase to amplify target sequences to quantify the presence of DNA sequences that code for CAT and PAH genes.