Title

Natural Systems to Treat Toxins: Mass Removal of Chlorinated Solvents

Presenter Information

Amanda Holmes

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Mathematics

Research Advisor

Burken, Joel G. (Joel Gerard)

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience (OURE)
US Environmental Protection Agency GRO Fellowship
NIEHS Superfund Research Program

Abstract

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are contaminants found frequently in the environment, including sites across the state of Missouri. Due to their location in the groundwater, detection and remediation are difficult. As plants have been shown to uptake VOCs, they have been increasingly used for site remediation and monitoring. Phytoremediation and phytoscreening have been found to be cost-effective, easily implemented, and more ecologically friendly when compared to traditional methods.

In this work, a full scale phytoremediation plot located at Schuman Park in Rolla, MO will be monitored using in-planta, groundwater, and evapotranspiration techniques.

Biography

Amanda Holmes is a junior at Missouri S&T studying mathematics. She is thankful to have had the opportunity to participate in environmental research under Dr. Joel Burken since she was in high school. Her hobbies include trout fishing, hiking, watching movies, and cooking.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, Second place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 1:00 PM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Natural Systems to Treat Toxins: Mass Removal of Chlorinated Solvents

Upper Atrium/Hall

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are contaminants found frequently in the environment, including sites across the state of Missouri. Due to their location in the groundwater, detection and remediation are difficult. As plants have been shown to uptake VOCs, they have been increasingly used for site remediation and monitoring. Phytoremediation and phytoscreening have been found to be cost-effective, easily implemented, and more ecologically friendly when compared to traditional methods.

In this work, a full scale phytoremediation plot located at Schuman Park in Rolla, MO will be monitored using in-planta, groundwater, and evapotranspiration techniques.