Title

The Effectiveness of an Online Plagiarism Intervention Module

Presenter Information

Jacob Goldsmith

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychological Science

Research Advisor

Henslee, Amber M.

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

More than half of all college undergraduates engage in academic dishonesty. Specifically, it is likely that plagiarism is more common than reported. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of an online academic integrity module (Group A) compared to a recorded online lecture (Group B). Thirty-six undergraduate psychology students were randomized to two groups. Participants in both groups completed an 11-item mastery-based quiz assessing their understanding of academic dishonesty. We hypothesized that students in Group A would exhibit fewer incidents of plagiarism and complete the quiz with fewer attempts as compared to Group B. Results revealed no statistically significant difference in incidents of plagiarism between the groups (X2 (1, N = 33) = .081, p = .78). A correlational analysis revealed a significant positive relation between the number of quiz attempts and the number of plagiarism incidents (r (31) = .388, p = .03).

Biography

Jacob is a Psychology major at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. As an undergraduate he has had the opportunity to be involved with various research projects. He has been a paid research assistant for Dr. Nancy Stone, a paid research assistant for the Army Research Lab in Maryland, a research assistant in Dr. Amber Henslee's lab on College Student Drinking, and is currently working on his OURE on a Plagiarism Intervention Program with Dr. Amber Henslee. Jacob plans to attend graduate school for his Ph.D. in Neuroscience, and later hopes to become a professor and researcher at the collegiate level.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Social sciences poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

The Effectiveness of an Online Plagiarism Intervention Module

Upper Atrium/Hallway

More than half of all college undergraduates engage in academic dishonesty. Specifically, it is likely that plagiarism is more common than reported. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of an online academic integrity module (Group A) compared to a recorded online lecture (Group B). Thirty-six undergraduate psychology students were randomized to two groups. Participants in both groups completed an 11-item mastery-based quiz assessing their understanding of academic dishonesty. We hypothesized that students in Group A would exhibit fewer incidents of plagiarism and complete the quiz with fewer attempts as compared to Group B. Results revealed no statistically significant difference in incidents of plagiarism between the groups (X2 (1, N = 33) = .081, p = .78). A correlational analysis revealed a significant positive relation between the number of quiz attempts and the number of plagiarism incidents (r (31) = .388, p = .03).