Title

Methamphetamine Contamination in Household Materials and the Effect of Skin Oil

Presenter Information

Julia Kuebrich

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Environmental Engineering

Research Advisor

Morrison, Glenn

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

The production of methamphetamine releases harmful chemicals into the air, which can then diffuse into and accumulate within the building structure, and later be 're-emitted' and cause absorption of methamphetamine into furnishings, clothing, and children's toys. People living in post-laboratory homes could be exposed to harmful levels of methamphetamine. In this research, we exposed clothing, skin oil contaminated clothing, furnishings, and children's toys to vapor phase methamphetamine in a laboratory chamber. We were able to determine the relationship between the concentration of methamphetamine in air (40ppb) and that which will accumulate in furnishings, clothing, skin oil, and children's toys. An implication of our findings is there is a risk of children ingesting more than 0.3μg/kg/day (California reference dose, actual values of child ingestion could be as great as 2.12 μg/kg/day for upholstery material) if they are mouthing exposed materials.

Biography

Julia Kuebrich is currently pursuing a Bachelor's of Science at Missouri S& Tin Environmental Engineering with a minor in Geological Engineering. Originally from Alton, IL, she plans to graduate in May 2013.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, Second place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Methamphetamine Contamination in Household Materials and the Effect of Skin Oil

Upper Atrium/Hallway

The production of methamphetamine releases harmful chemicals into the air, which can then diffuse into and accumulate within the building structure, and later be 're-emitted' and cause absorption of methamphetamine into furnishings, clothing, and children's toys. People living in post-laboratory homes could be exposed to harmful levels of methamphetamine. In this research, we exposed clothing, skin oil contaminated clothing, furnishings, and children's toys to vapor phase methamphetamine in a laboratory chamber. We were able to determine the relationship between the concentration of methamphetamine in air (40ppb) and that which will accumulate in furnishings, clothing, skin oil, and children's toys. An implication of our findings is there is a risk of children ingesting more than 0.3μg/kg/day (California reference dose, actual values of child ingestion could be as great as 2.12 μg/kg/day for upholstery material) if they are mouthing exposed materials.