Title

Through The Grapevine

Presenter Information

Tyler Herrell

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Japanese beetles (JB), or Popilia japonica, are sweeping away agricultural crops across the nation. With grapes having a high value in the food industry, such as jellies, wine, and the raw product themselves, it is vital to protect these crops from this invasive beetle. A store bought lure can deter a small population, but on a larger scale, such as a 100 acre vineyard, it is not cost efficient or effective. A natural pesticide, B. thuringiensis (Bt), found in fertile earth is known to be a predator of the Japanese beetle. Using genetic engineering, predictions have been made that the Bt toxin gene can be introduce the into the grapes, then expressing the gene through the leaves will lead to a biological pesticide, controlling the infestation. Successful completion of this project will prevent millions of dollars' worth of damage and a more permanent solution to protect vineyards country wide.

Biography

Tyler is a junior at Missouri University of Science and Technology. He is studying Biochemical Engineering. He is a member of Sigma Nu Fraternity as well as the Honorary Fraternity Order of Omega. He is working on a future at a respected Engineering company.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint Project with Justin Lovelady

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Through The Grapevine

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Japanese beetles (JB), or Popilia japonica, are sweeping away agricultural crops across the nation. With grapes having a high value in the food industry, such as jellies, wine, and the raw product themselves, it is vital to protect these crops from this invasive beetle. A store bought lure can deter a small population, but on a larger scale, such as a 100 acre vineyard, it is not cost efficient or effective. A natural pesticide, B. thuringiensis (Bt), found in fertile earth is known to be a predator of the Japanese beetle. Using genetic engineering, predictions have been made that the Bt toxin gene can be introduce the into the grapes, then expressing the gene through the leaves will lead to a biological pesticide, controlling the infestation. Successful completion of this project will prevent millions of dollars' worth of damage and a more permanent solution to protect vineyards country wide.