Title

Got Microbes? Finding the Link between Diet and Obesity

Presenter Information

Michelle Gibson

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Environmental Engineering

Research Advisor

Oerther, Daniel B.

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

John A. and Susan Mathes Endowed Chair of Environmental Engineering

Abstract

Obesity rates in the US continue to rise, with more than 30% of adults and around 20% of children are obese. Obesity is an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and other chronic diseases making it a number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the US and worldwide. A growing body of research suggests the involvement of the gut microbiota, specifically microbial products in triggering a lowgrade chronic inflammation apart from the traditional view of poor diet and lack of exercise. In the current study, we studied the effect of "Western" diet on the cecal microbiota in pigs to understand the relationship between diet, gut microbiota and obesity. DNA sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene was applied to study the composition of microbial community. Preliminary results of the study demonstrate positive, statistically significant association between the diet, gut microbiota composition and obese phenotype.

Biography

Michelle is sophomore majoring in Environmental Engineering and minoring in Spanish. She has been involved in many campus organizations including Christian Campus Fellowship and Engineers without Borders. She is currently an Resident Assistant in the Quad.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Got Microbes? Finding the Link between Diet and Obesity

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Obesity rates in the US continue to rise, with more than 30% of adults and around 20% of children are obese. Obesity is an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and other chronic diseases making it a number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the US and worldwide. A growing body of research suggests the involvement of the gut microbiota, specifically microbial products in triggering a lowgrade chronic inflammation apart from the traditional view of poor diet and lack of exercise. In the current study, we studied the effect of "Western" diet on the cecal microbiota in pigs to understand the relationship between diet, gut microbiota and obesity. DNA sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene was applied to study the composition of microbial community. Preliminary results of the study demonstrate positive, statistically significant association between the diet, gut microbiota composition and obese phenotype.