Title

Why the Deletion of the RGCT Domain of the IQG1 Protein in Budding Yeast Causes Cell Death and Cytokinesis Failure?

Presenter Information

Brandon Drennen

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences with Chemistry minor

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

The final step in cell division is cytokinesis. Cytokinesis must be coordinated with mitosis in order to prevent aneuploidy. Budding yeast are a good model organism for studying cytokinesis due to genetic and molecular tools and inexpensive growth medium. IQG1 is a protein that has been shown to regulate cytokinesis in budding yeast cells. The IQG1 protein contains four domains: IQ motifs that are needed for localization of IQG1 to the contractile ring, a CHO domain required for actin recruitment, a GAP domain essential for contraction, and a RGCT domain that was predicted to interact with form ins Bni1 and Bnr1. However, we found that a deletion of the RGCT domain of the protein is still able to interact with the form ins. Analysis of haploid spores showed that the RGCt is required for cell viability. Our current goal is to determine why the yeast cells die after the RGCT deletion.

Biography

Brandon is a junior majoring in Biological Sciences at Missouri University of Science and Technology. He grew up in Freeburg, MO and attended Fatima High School in Westphalia. He comes from a family of five brothers with loving parents and is the first one in the family to go to a 4 year college. Brandon is incredibly bright and treats others with both respect and tolerance. Brandon's future career goals are that he would like to either go to pharmacy school or attend grad school in hopes of creating new drugs that can combat human diseases such as cancer, AIDS, and many more.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Why the Deletion of the RGCT Domain of the IQG1 Protein in Budding Yeast Causes Cell Death and Cytokinesis Failure?

Upper Atrium/Hallway

The final step in cell division is cytokinesis. Cytokinesis must be coordinated with mitosis in order to prevent aneuploidy. Budding yeast are a good model organism for studying cytokinesis due to genetic and molecular tools and inexpensive growth medium. IQG1 is a protein that has been shown to regulate cytokinesis in budding yeast cells. The IQG1 protein contains four domains: IQ motifs that are needed for localization of IQG1 to the contractile ring, a CHO domain required for actin recruitment, a GAP domain essential for contraction, and a RGCT domain that was predicted to interact with form ins Bni1 and Bnr1. However, we found that a deletion of the RGCT domain of the protein is still able to interact with the form ins. Analysis of haploid spores showed that the RGCt is required for cell viability. Our current goal is to determine why the yeast cells die after the RGCT deletion.