Title

Synthetic Biology Approach to Create a Hybrid Extracellular Supramolecular Machine to Breakdown Free Mycolic Fatty Acids and a Feedback System to Produce a TB Inhibitory Peptide

Presenter Information

David Pohlman

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

iGEM

Abstract

With the advancement of modern medicine tuberculosis is still causing many deaths around the world. Tuberculosis is caused by a Mycobacteria tuberculosis infection that can arise from ingesting or inhaling M. tuberculosis tubercle bacilli. The bacteria then take residence within the body, mainly the lungs, causing painful lesions. The body’s natural defense to M. tuberculosis infections is to ingest the cells by means of endocytes, but all Mycobacterium produce a waxy coating made up of free mycolic fatty acids and the endocytes cannot breakdown the bacteria. I propose to use synthetic biology to create a hybrid protein of the Clostridium cellulovorans’ cellulosome and the peroxisomal multifunctional – protein 2 to be able to breakdown extracellular free fatty acids that will allow anti – TB drugs and endocytes to stop/kill the infectious bacteria. A feedback system that responds to the degradation of mycolic fatty acids will also be made by synthetic biology. This will was the production and secretion of a stem and loop peptide structure, called lariatins, which have been studied to inhibit mycobacterial growth.

Biography

David is a junior in Biochemical Engineering and is the Vice President of the new student design team the International Genetically Engineered Machines team, iGEM.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Research proposal poster session, Second place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 10th, 1:00 PM Apr 10th, 3:00 PM

Synthetic Biology Approach to Create a Hybrid Extracellular Supramolecular Machine to Breakdown Free Mycolic Fatty Acids and a Feedback System to Produce a TB Inhibitory Peptide

Upper Atrium/Hallway

With the advancement of modern medicine tuberculosis is still causing many deaths around the world. Tuberculosis is caused by a Mycobacteria tuberculosis infection that can arise from ingesting or inhaling M. tuberculosis tubercle bacilli. The bacteria then take residence within the body, mainly the lungs, causing painful lesions. The body’s natural defense to M. tuberculosis infections is to ingest the cells by means of endocytes, but all Mycobacterium produce a waxy coating made up of free mycolic fatty acids and the endocytes cannot breakdown the bacteria. I propose to use synthetic biology to create a hybrid protein of the Clostridium cellulovorans’ cellulosome and the peroxisomal multifunctional – protein 2 to be able to breakdown extracellular free fatty acids that will allow anti – TB drugs and endocytes to stop/kill the infectious bacteria. A feedback system that responds to the degradation of mycolic fatty acids will also be made by synthetic biology. This will was the production and secretion of a stem and loop peptide structure, called lariatins, which have been studied to inhibit mycobacterial growth.