Title

Validating Developed Microbial Source Tracking Methods for Missouri Waterways

Presenter Information

Melissa Buechlein

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Environmental Engineering

Research Advisor

Oerther, Daniel B.

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

Mathes Chair of Environmental Engineering

Abstract

Approximately ten percent of Missouri waterways are contaminated by biological pollution. As required by Clean Water Act, all waterways must be tested for Escherichia coli contamination because this bacterium indicates the potential for fecal contamination. The methods currently used yield results that require a significant amount of time for processing and lack accuracy in the results. Few researchers have devoted funding necessary for developing better methods for discovering biological contamination. However, previous members of our research team developed 16S rRNA-targeted methods to evaluate bacterium from humans, wildlife, and live stock to better this field of study. Our current objective is establishing the validity for these new methods in order to incorporate them into the field. This is the next crucial step in gaining acceptance of these methods.

Biography

Melissa is a second year student at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She is majoring in Environmental engineering with a minor in both Geological Engineering and Geology. With her degree she hopes to work in remediation of contaminated sites. With this as her goal, the research opportunity in Microbial Source Tracking instantly excited her. Melissa is a member of several organizations on campus, including: Zeta Tau Alpha, EcoMiners, Alpha Phi Omega, and Aerial Swing Dancing.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 10th, 1:00 PM Apr 10th, 3:00 PM

Validating Developed Microbial Source Tracking Methods for Missouri Waterways

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Approximately ten percent of Missouri waterways are contaminated by biological pollution. As required by Clean Water Act, all waterways must be tested for Escherichia coli contamination because this bacterium indicates the potential for fecal contamination. The methods currently used yield results that require a significant amount of time for processing and lack accuracy in the results. Few researchers have devoted funding necessary for developing better methods for discovering biological contamination. However, previous members of our research team developed 16S rRNA-targeted methods to evaluate bacterium from humans, wildlife, and live stock to better this field of study. Our current objective is establishing the validity for these new methods in order to incorporate them into the field. This is the next crucial step in gaining acceptance of these methods.