Title

Predictive and Convergent Validity of Ability-Bas Emotional Intelligence Assessments

Presenter Information

Leslie Hagen

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychological Science

Research Advisor

Martin, James H.

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

This study (n = 141) examined the convergent validity for two new measures of Emotional Intelligence (EI), the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU) and the Situational Test of Emotional Management (STEM), using correlational data from an established measure of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Both the STEU and STEM correlated significantly and positively with the MSCEIT total score and their corresponding branch scores. The predictive validity of EI was also examined using happiness, student satisfaction, and group performance as criterion variables. Happiness was negatively related to EI, and no relation was found between EI and group performance or student satisfaction. Results suggest that group performance is better predicted by attitude and personality, and that the predictive value of EI is not within the realm of academic success.

Biography

Leslie is a senior in the department of Psychological Sciences.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Social Sciences poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 7th, 1:00 PM Apr 7th, 3:00 PM

Predictive and Convergent Validity of Ability-Bas Emotional Intelligence Assessments

Upper Atrium/Hallway

This study (n = 141) examined the convergent validity for two new measures of Emotional Intelligence (EI), the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU) and the Situational Test of Emotional Management (STEM), using correlational data from an established measure of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Both the STEU and STEM correlated significantly and positively with the MSCEIT total score and their corresponding branch scores. The predictive validity of EI was also examined using happiness, student satisfaction, and group performance as criterion variables. Happiness was negatively related to EI, and no relation was found between EI and group performance or student satisfaction. Results suggest that group performance is better predicted by attitude and personality, and that the predictive value of EI is not within the realm of academic success.