Title

The Dark Side of Leadership Psychology among Developing Military Officers

Presenter Information

Angela Hundt

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychology

Research Advisor

Martin, James H.

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Abstract

This report summarizes the findings of Angela K. Hundt’s research project with the Department of Psychological Science begun in fall 2009, under the supervision of Dr. Jim Martin. The purpose of this study was to examine leaders in training to determine if dysfunctional leaders can be caught early in their training. AFROTC cadets were evaluated for leadership potential through four sources: supervisors, two peers, and the cadets themselves. Evaluation scores were then correlated with cadet scores on a self-report personality inventory that was designed to access DSM-IV Axis II disorders (e.g., Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder). Consistent with most experience in multi-source ratings, self-appraisals of performance tended to be higher than ratings from supervisors and peers.

Biography

Angela K. Hundt is a senior Psychology major whose primary interests in psychology are personality traits of leaders as well as contributing factors to developing leadership. Angela is a fourth year cadet in Air Force ROTC and will commission as a Second Lieutenant upon graduation in May 2010. She will begin her career as a Public Affairs Officer at Dyess AFB, Texas. In addition to Air Force ROTC, Angela is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha fraternity and Psi Chi, the national psychology honor society.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Social Sciences oral presentation, Second place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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Apr 7th, 1:00 PM Apr 7th, 1:30 PM

The Dark Side of Leadership Psychology among Developing Military Officers

Carver Room

This report summarizes the findings of Angela K. Hundt’s research project with the Department of Psychological Science begun in fall 2009, under the supervision of Dr. Jim Martin. The purpose of this study was to examine leaders in training to determine if dysfunctional leaders can be caught early in their training. AFROTC cadets were evaluated for leadership potential through four sources: supervisors, two peers, and the cadets themselves. Evaluation scores were then correlated with cadet scores on a self-report personality inventory that was designed to access DSM-IV Axis II disorders (e.g., Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder). Consistent with most experience in multi-source ratings, self-appraisals of performance tended to be higher than ratings from supervisors and peers.