Title

Isolation of Root Nodule Bacteria from Crotalaria Spectabilis Used to Detoxify Trichloroethylene

Presenter Information

Erin Sind

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology Pre Med

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program; Biological Sciences Department

Abstract

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chemical used in adhesives, paint removers, spot removers, and other commercial products. TCE can be very harmful not only to the environment but also to human health. Three different plants have been identified in TCE contaminated soil in South Carolina. One species, Crotalaria spectabilis, was shown to detoxify TCE while the other two do not. TCE detoxification was associated with the root nodules of the plant. The goal of this project is to isolate and identify the bacteria in the nodules of C. spectabilis and the other two species to determine if the bacteria in C. spectabilis are responsible for the plant's ability to detoxify TCE. We isolated bacteria from twelve different nodules and are sequencing the 16S rRNA genes to identify the bacteria.

Biography

Erin Sind is a junior in the Biological Sciences department. She is the daughter of Joseph and Joann Sind of St. Louis, Missouri. Erin graduated from Cor Jesu Academy. She is currently an active member of Chi Omega and various other organizations on campus. Erin plans on graduating in May 2010 with a Bachelors of Science Degree in Biology with a Pre Med focus.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 8th, 9:00 AM Apr 8th, 11:45 AM

Isolation of Root Nodule Bacteria from Crotalaria Spectabilis Used to Detoxify Trichloroethylene

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chemical used in adhesives, paint removers, spot removers, and other commercial products. TCE can be very harmful not only to the environment but also to human health. Three different plants have been identified in TCE contaminated soil in South Carolina. One species, Crotalaria spectabilis, was shown to detoxify TCE while the other two do not. TCE detoxification was associated with the root nodules of the plant. The goal of this project is to isolate and identify the bacteria in the nodules of C. spectabilis and the other two species to determine if the bacteria in C. spectabilis are responsible for the plant's ability to detoxify TCE. We isolated bacteria from twelve different nodules and are sequencing the 16S rRNA genes to identify the bacteria.