Title

Guiding of Molecular Ions by a Capillary Insulator

Presenter Information

Spencer Garr

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Aerospace Engineering

Research Advisor

DuBois, R. D. (Robert D.), 1951-

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

National Science Foundation

Abstract

An insulator charges up when exposed to charged particles. It has been shown that this can be used to guide beams of electrons and ions through micron and nanometer diameter capillaries in various insulators. Also, the direction of these beams can be changed by several degrees by rotating the capillary and millimeter diameter beams can be reduced to micron diameters by using tapered capillaries. This is because the beams are guided after they charge the inside surface of the capillary. This charge then repels the ions such that they follow the capillary direction. We are investigating this using molecular, rather than atomic, ions. Thus far we have transmitted beams through an insulating capillary, plus shown that they follow the capillary direction and the molecules don’t break apart. The next step is to measure their energies after they exit plus the intensity change with degree of rotation.

Biography

Spencer Garr is currently a junior in the Aerospace Engineering department. He is working in a physics lab simply because he was interested and had an opportunity to do so. This is the first time he has ever worked in a lab of this kind. Most of the work he has done has been on a farm since that is where he grew up. Eventually he would like to work in research dealing with space travel, including the research into faster than light travel.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 8th, 9:00 AM Apr 8th, 11:45 AM

Guiding of Molecular Ions by a Capillary Insulator

Upper Atrium/Hallway

An insulator charges up when exposed to charged particles. It has been shown that this can be used to guide beams of electrons and ions through micron and nanometer diameter capillaries in various insulators. Also, the direction of these beams can be changed by several degrees by rotating the capillary and millimeter diameter beams can be reduced to micron diameters by using tapered capillaries. This is because the beams are guided after they charge the inside surface of the capillary. This charge then repels the ions such that they follow the capillary direction. We are investigating this using molecular, rather than atomic, ions. Thus far we have transmitted beams through an insulating capillary, plus shown that they follow the capillary direction and the molecules don’t break apart. The next step is to measure their energies after they exit plus the intensity change with degree of rotation.