Title

In Vitro Development of Dental Abfractions

Presenter Information

Beth Groenke

Major

Interdisciplinary Engineering

Research Advisor

Carroll, Douglas R.

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

Private Contributions from Dr. Douglas Carroll and Dr. Bill Moorkamp

Abstract

Abfraction is a relatively new concept in dentistry, and there is still debate as to whether or not it even exists. What is accepted is that lesions can develop near the cervical areas of some teeth, broadly defined as non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). One possible cause of these lesions may be dental abfraction. Those that accept the theory of abfraction believe that tensile and compressive forces placed on the teeth from nonaxial, cyclical loading over an individual’s lifetime cause the breakdown of the microstructure of the teeth, which can lead to the NCCL, also sometimes known as an abfraction. In this study, non-axial, cyclical loading was applied to an intact permanent maxillary first premolar. SEM images from the control and experimental teeth indicate that the experimental tooth experienced more wear, from the compressive forces, at the microscopic level than the control tooth. This evidence supports the theory of dental abfraction.

Biography

Beth Groenke is a senior in Interdisciplinary Engineering with a biomedical emphasis. Beth is the daughter of David and Sharon Groenke of Gerald, MO. She will graduate with honors in May before beginning dental school at the University of Missouri – Kansas City in August. Beth has been an active member of the S&T campus community since her freshmen year, including a term as Student Body President from 2007-2008. This, however, is Beth’s first venture into the world of research.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Sciences oral presentation, First place

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 9:00 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 8th, 9:00 AM Apr 8th, 9:30 AM

In Vitro Development of Dental Abfractions

Turner Room

Abfraction is a relatively new concept in dentistry, and there is still debate as to whether or not it even exists. What is accepted is that lesions can develop near the cervical areas of some teeth, broadly defined as non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). One possible cause of these lesions may be dental abfraction. Those that accept the theory of abfraction believe that tensile and compressive forces placed on the teeth from nonaxial, cyclical loading over an individual’s lifetime cause the breakdown of the microstructure of the teeth, which can lead to the NCCL, also sometimes known as an abfraction. In this study, non-axial, cyclical loading was applied to an intact permanent maxillary first premolar. SEM images from the control and experimental teeth indicate that the experimental tooth experienced more wear, from the compressive forces, at the microscopic level than the control tooth. This evidence supports the theory of dental abfraction.