Masters Theses

Abstract

“A Product Architecture based Conceptual Design for Assembly Technique (PACDFA) is presented in this thesis. The goal of this technique is the redesign of products at the conceptual stage of the design process, such that the product is modular in architecture with minimal number of components in each module and also easier to assemble. The hypothesis stated is that the piece count reduction and ease of assembly can be achieved by designing products to be modular in architecture. This technique develops on the existing functional basis method, which is used to generate the function structure of the product and identification of modules using the module heuristics method. The modules once identified, the connection between them is predicted with the help of a database. This database is created by analyzing ten products and documenting the connections for the modules in the products. The validation of the technique is shown by applying it to the redesign of two products namely the popcorn popper and the electric wok”--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Stone, Robert B.
Roy, Samit

Committee Member(s)

McAdams, Daniel A.

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Comments

The author is thankful to the Intelligent Systems Center for the funding provided for this research.

Research Center/Lab(s)

Intelligent Systems Center

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Fall 2000

Pagination

x, 114 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 111-113).

Rights

© 2000 Varghese Joseph Kayyalethekkel, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Thesis Number

T 7816

Print OCLC #

45694525

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b4498598~S5

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