Masters Theses

Abstract

"This thesis focuses on the application of statistical techniques for pattern classification where the patterns are power spectra of the recorded acoustic signals of occluded objects. Different approaches used to classify are : The Bayes linear and piece-wise linear classifiers, the correlation classifier, classification using error spectra and the clustering algorithm. Classifiers were designed and experiments were conducted to investigate the performance. The performance is evaluated in terms of the percentage efficiency by counting the number of vectors identified correctly and the number of vectors which were misclassified. The feature vectors from primitive measurement space is then reduced to lesser lengths using the techniques of minimum mean square error (MMSE, feature selection using largest eigenvalues) and the Gram-Schmidt procedure. The classification is again performed on the processed set of feature vectors in the new vector space. The performance of feature extractors was compared by observing the capability of vectors to contribute towards correct classification even after their lengths are reduced. Results of all the experiments performed are explained"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Stuller, John A.

Committee Member(s)

Moss, Randy Hays, 1953-
Dagli, Cihan H., 1949-

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Spring 2000

Pagination

x, 81 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 80).

Rights

© 2000 Vivek Ramaprasad, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Thesis Number

T 7711

Print OCLC #

43931403

Electronic OCLC #

1101100699

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b4414631~S5

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