Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

On August 3rd, 1993, a sequence of earthquakes began in the central part of the Gulf of Aqaba, northern Red Sea at the Aragonese Deep. The largest event (MD = 5.5) on August 3rd had an origin time of 12:42:43.22 GMT, a latitude of 28.628° N and longitude 34.644° E. This event was followed by more than 15000 events greater than 2 magnitude with some felt earthquakes. On the same spot, another sequence of earthquakes began late 1995. The largest event (MD = 5.9) on November 22 had an origin time of 04:15:12.30 GMT, a latitude of 28.8° N and longitude 34.7° E. This event was followed by more than 8000 aftershocks (1.5 D° N – 29.3° N and 34.6° E – 34.9° E. Focal mechanism were investigated by using data set obtained from the Seismic Network of the Seismic Studies Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and the National Seismic Network at Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics Researches, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. The data set included P-wave first motions of significant earthquake activity in this sequences mainly. A total of 67 events was selected for focal mechanism analysis. The P-wave data from the surrounding seismic networks were also utilized additionally. The structural picture revealed fi-om the focal mechanism solutions shows that the area in general characterized by strike-slip and dip-slip faulting. The mechanism of the first consistent with left-lateral strike-slip on N-NE trending faults of the Dead Sea Transform System. The second consistent with normal faults that generally trend E-W. The main objective of this work is to study the focal mechanism of the recent Northern Red Sea sequences of August 1993 and November 1995 and to associate these sequences with faulting types that were found before using different methods.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Focal Mechanism Analyses of the 1993, 1995 Northern red Sea Sequences Activity

San Diego, California

On August 3rd, 1993, a sequence of earthquakes began in the central part of the Gulf of Aqaba, northern Red Sea at the Aragonese Deep. The largest event (MD = 5.5) on August 3rd had an origin time of 12:42:43.22 GMT, a latitude of 28.628° N and longitude 34.644° E. This event was followed by more than 15000 events greater than 2 magnitude with some felt earthquakes. On the same spot, another sequence of earthquakes began late 1995. The largest event (MD = 5.9) on November 22 had an origin time of 04:15:12.30 GMT, a latitude of 28.8° N and longitude 34.7° E. This event was followed by more than 8000 aftershocks (1.5 D° N – 29.3° N and 34.6° E – 34.9° E. Focal mechanism were investigated by using data set obtained from the Seismic Network of the Seismic Studies Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and the National Seismic Network at Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics Researches, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. The data set included P-wave first motions of significant earthquake activity in this sequences mainly. A total of 67 events was selected for focal mechanism analysis. The P-wave data from the surrounding seismic networks were also utilized additionally. The structural picture revealed fi-om the focal mechanism solutions shows that the area in general characterized by strike-slip and dip-slip faulting. The mechanism of the first consistent with left-lateral strike-slip on N-NE trending faults of the Dead Sea Transform System. The second consistent with normal faults that generally trend E-W. The main objective of this work is to study the focal mechanism of the recent Northern Red Sea sequences of August 1993 and November 1995 and to associate these sequences with faulting types that were found before using different methods.