Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

A field liquefaction test was conducted in Delta, B.C., Canada. The target layer was a loose sandy silt between the 10 and 12 m depth. The test layer was instrumented with two triaxial accelerometers, dynamic and static pore pressure transducers, and Sondex tubes to measure vertical ground strain. An array of boreholes was drilled around the instrument cluster and charged with explosives. Delays were introduced to the detonation sequence in order to generate multiple blast pulses. The cyclic loading from the blasting generated a series of shear and compressive strain pulses. We consider that shear strain dominates residual pore pressure rise and that shear strain amplitudes can be induced by blasting similar to those caused by an earthquake. In this way, the susceptibility of the ground to pore pressure generation caused by cyclic shear straining and post-liquefaction deformations of the ground are tested. Details of methods used to estimate shear strains induced by the blasting process are described.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Use of Controlled Detonation of Explosives for Liquefaction Testing

San Diego, California

A field liquefaction test was conducted in Delta, B.C., Canada. The target layer was a loose sandy silt between the 10 and 12 m depth. The test layer was instrumented with two triaxial accelerometers, dynamic and static pore pressure transducers, and Sondex tubes to measure vertical ground strain. An array of boreholes was drilled around the instrument cluster and charged with explosives. Delays were introduced to the detonation sequence in order to generate multiple blast pulses. The cyclic loading from the blasting generated a series of shear and compressive strain pulses. We consider that shear strain dominates residual pore pressure rise and that shear strain amplitudes can be induced by blasting similar to those caused by an earthquake. In this way, the susceptibility of the ground to pore pressure generation caused by cyclic shear straining and post-liquefaction deformations of the ground are tested. Details of methods used to estimate shear strains induced by the blasting process are described.