Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

Soldier pile tieback walls have been widely used by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for stabilizing deep landslides and retaining cuts into unstable slopes under static earth forces for several decades now. However, the seismic load-deformation behavior of this wall type is not well known even though several Caltrans designed walls have undergone moderate seismic shaking without notable signs of distress. This paper introduces a reasonably simple load-deformation process used in analyzing a proposed 20.9 m high temporary tieback wall (to be reduced to an 18 m permanent height) located approximately 32 kilometers north of the Oakland Bay Bridge in California. The design procedure incorporates slope stability and soil-pile-tendon interaction processes incorporating public domain programs. The results demonstrate that application of the seismic earth pressure increment mobilizes the reserve load bearing capacity of the wall system resulting in quantifiable wall deformations. The process indicates that application of normal design procedures can result in a wall system quite tolerable of significant design seismic events prior to tendon or pile yield due to two sources of the reserve capacity normally existing in the wall system. One is due to tendon stretch from lock-off to tendon yield, and secondarily to pile yield capacity provided the piles extend below the slide surface. These factors result in a stable, flexible wall system able to accommodate substantially increased loads with acceptable deformations as indicated by the soil-pile-tendon interaction process.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Evaluation of a Soldier Pile-Tieback Wall at Carquinez Bridge

San Diego, California

Soldier pile tieback walls have been widely used by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for stabilizing deep landslides and retaining cuts into unstable slopes under static earth forces for several decades now. However, the seismic load-deformation behavior of this wall type is not well known even though several Caltrans designed walls have undergone moderate seismic shaking without notable signs of distress. This paper introduces a reasonably simple load-deformation process used in analyzing a proposed 20.9 m high temporary tieback wall (to be reduced to an 18 m permanent height) located approximately 32 kilometers north of the Oakland Bay Bridge in California. The design procedure incorporates slope stability and soil-pile-tendon interaction processes incorporating public domain programs. The results demonstrate that application of the seismic earth pressure increment mobilizes the reserve load bearing capacity of the wall system resulting in quantifiable wall deformations. The process indicates that application of normal design procedures can result in a wall system quite tolerable of significant design seismic events prior to tendon or pile yield due to two sources of the reserve capacity normally existing in the wall system. One is due to tendon stretch from lock-off to tendon yield, and secondarily to pile yield capacity provided the piles extend below the slide surface. These factors result in a stable, flexible wall system able to accommodate substantially increased loads with acceptable deformations as indicated by the soil-pile-tendon interaction process.