Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

Amplification studies for New York City (NYC) soil sites are summarized herein. Ten (10) typical soil profiles from Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan, are analyzed using one-dimensional SHAKE methods. Dynamic soil properties are derived using state-of-practice correlations with standard penetration resistance and compared to available in-situ geophysical measurements. Three different rock motions are utilized, each modified from real records to match 500- and 2500-year probabilistic spectra. Results are presented in terms of dimensionless ratios of response spectra (RRS) and surface response spectra. The effect of the impedance contrast between soil and rock on soil amplification is examined. It is shown that although seismic hazard in the area is only moderate, significant soil effects can be generated and lead to large soil amplifications. By comparing the derived spectra with the design spectra defined by the 1998 NYC Department of Transportation guidelines, it is shown that the latter may be unconservative at short periods. Comparison of the results with the design spectra of the 1995 NYC Seismic Code shows that the Code provides conservative design parameters, but unconservative amplification values.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Seismic Amplification of Typical New York City Soil Profiles

San Diego, California

Amplification studies for New York City (NYC) soil sites are summarized herein. Ten (10) typical soil profiles from Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan, are analyzed using one-dimensional SHAKE methods. Dynamic soil properties are derived using state-of-practice correlations with standard penetration resistance and compared to available in-situ geophysical measurements. Three different rock motions are utilized, each modified from real records to match 500- and 2500-year probabilistic spectra. Results are presented in terms of dimensionless ratios of response spectra (RRS) and surface response spectra. The effect of the impedance contrast between soil and rock on soil amplification is examined. It is shown that although seismic hazard in the area is only moderate, significant soil effects can be generated and lead to large soil amplifications. By comparing the derived spectra with the design spectra defined by the 1998 NYC Department of Transportation guidelines, it is shown that the latter may be unconservative at short periods. Comparison of the results with the design spectra of the 1995 NYC Seismic Code shows that the Code provides conservative design parameters, but unconservative amplification values.