Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The Philippine earthquake of July 16, 1990 (MS = 7.8), of which epicenter is about 100 km north of Manila city, was one of the most costly single natural disasters in Philippine history. The loss of life of over 1,600 persons resulted. Extensive damage to buildings, roads, embankments, natural slopes, and bridges was observed in a widespread area of approximately 20,000 square kilometers. One of the major causes of the damage was liquefaction of various sandy soils including artificially fills, alluvial deposits of river delta, and sandbars. This paper presents a preliminary overview of damage aspects of the earthquake, with emphasis on liquefaction-induced damage of various structures.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Preliminary Report on the Geotechnical Aspects of the Philippine Earthquake of July 16, 1990

St. Louis, Missouri

The Philippine earthquake of July 16, 1990 (MS = 7.8), of which epicenter is about 100 km north of Manila city, was one of the most costly single natural disasters in Philippine history. The loss of life of over 1,600 persons resulted. Extensive damage to buildings, roads, embankments, natural slopes, and bridges was observed in a widespread area of approximately 20,000 square kilometers. One of the major causes of the damage was liquefaction of various sandy soils including artificially fills, alluvial deposits of river delta, and sandbars. This paper presents a preliminary overview of damage aspects of the earthquake, with emphasis on liquefaction-induced damage of various structures.