Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

Since the Band-Limited-White-Noise (BLWN) source model coupled with random vibration theory (RVT) was first developed in the early 1980's, it has been used successfully to predict strong ground motions at rock sites in different tectonic regimes. The BLWN-RVT methodology is appropriate for an engineering characterization of strong ground motions at a site since the method captures the important features of these motions in terms of peak acceleration and spectral composition and requires a minimum of input parameters. Recently, the capability to estimate strong ground motions at soil sites has been incorporated into the methodology by using RVT and plane-wave propagators in an equivalent-linear formulation. Thus, non-linear soil response that may occur at high strain levels can now be directly estimated and analyzed. Four cases in which the BLWN-RVT methodology has been applied to predict strong ground motions will be discussed: (l) a moment magnitude (M) 7.9 New Madrid earthquake located 10 km beneath a rock site and a deep soil site; (2) a M 6.9 event similar to the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake at several rock and thin soil sites at source-to-site distances of 10 to 27 km; (3) a M 8.0 Cascadia subduction zone earthquake at both a deep alluvial and hypothetical hard rock site in Seattle, Washington at a source-to-site distance of 70 km; and (4) a M 7.0 earthquake occurring along the Hayward fault in the eastern San Francisco Bay region at an 18-m-thick soil site, 15 km from the fault. The effects of soil amplification or deamplification (possibly due to either non-linear soil response or soil damping) will be emphasized in these case histories.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Applications of the Band-Limited-White Noise Source Model for Predicting Site-Specific Strong Ground Motions

St. Louis, Missouri

Since the Band-Limited-White-Noise (BLWN) source model coupled with random vibration theory (RVT) was first developed in the early 1980's, it has been used successfully to predict strong ground motions at rock sites in different tectonic regimes. The BLWN-RVT methodology is appropriate for an engineering characterization of strong ground motions at a site since the method captures the important features of these motions in terms of peak acceleration and spectral composition and requires a minimum of input parameters. Recently, the capability to estimate strong ground motions at soil sites has been incorporated into the methodology by using RVT and plane-wave propagators in an equivalent-linear formulation. Thus, non-linear soil response that may occur at high strain levels can now be directly estimated and analyzed. Four cases in which the BLWN-RVT methodology has been applied to predict strong ground motions will be discussed: (l) a moment magnitude (M) 7.9 New Madrid earthquake located 10 km beneath a rock site and a deep soil site; (2) a M 6.9 event similar to the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake at several rock and thin soil sites at source-to-site distances of 10 to 27 km; (3) a M 8.0 Cascadia subduction zone earthquake at both a deep alluvial and hypothetical hard rock site in Seattle, Washington at a source-to-site distance of 70 km; and (4) a M 7.0 earthquake occurring along the Hayward fault in the eastern San Francisco Bay region at an 18-m-thick soil site, 15 km from the fault. The effects of soil amplification or deamplification (possibly due to either non-linear soil response or soil damping) will be emphasized in these case histories.