Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

For an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 or larger, different published relations between magnitude, M, and epicentral intensity, I0, yield I0 values which may differ from each other by as much as one intensity unit or more. This implies an uncertainty of a factor of about 2 in the estimation of maximum ground acceleration. New empirical relations between M and I0 are derived using the revised estimates of I0 for several earthquakes. Suitability of some of the commonly used M - I0 relations for the estimation of maximum ground acceleration is examined by deriving acceleration-distance curves for different magnitude earthquakes (viz., 5.6, 6.6 and 7.6), using an intensity attenuation relation for the San Andreas attenuation province. The intensity to acceleration conversion is accomplished by using the relation published by Trifunac and Brady (1975). These acceleration-distance curves are compared with several recent acceleration attenuation studies for the western United States. It is found that the use of M - I0 relation derived in this study yields satisfactory acceleration-distance curves for different magnitudes.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Different Magnitude-Epicentral Intensity Relations and Estimation of Maximum Ground Acceleration

St. Louis, Missouri

For an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 or larger, different published relations between magnitude, M, and epicentral intensity, I0, yield I0 values which may differ from each other by as much as one intensity unit or more. This implies an uncertainty of a factor of about 2 in the estimation of maximum ground acceleration. New empirical relations between M and I0 are derived using the revised estimates of I0 for several earthquakes. Suitability of some of the commonly used M - I0 relations for the estimation of maximum ground acceleration is examined by deriving acceleration-distance curves for different magnitude earthquakes (viz., 5.6, 6.6 and 7.6), using an intensity attenuation relation for the San Andreas attenuation province. The intensity to acceleration conversion is accomplished by using the relation published by Trifunac and Brady (1975). These acceleration-distance curves are compared with several recent acceleration attenuation studies for the western United States. It is found that the use of M - I0 relation derived in this study yields satisfactory acceleration-distance curves for different magnitudes.