Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

Although induced seismicity associated with the impounding of reservoirs is a relatively rare phenomenon, it should nevertheless be taken into account, particularly in the design of dams located in aseismic zones. The operation of dams is not significantly affected by induced activities: the main concern arises in situations where unexpected events might affect the behavior of the construction due to soil liquefaction or might affect slope stability. This paper reviews the principal elements which are considered to affect the occurrence of the phenomenon: the weight of the water storage, and the development of pore pressure under the storage. Both elements make differing contributions to the triggering conditions. The occurrence is related to special geological conditions difficult to evaluate but expressed mainly by the presence of brittle rock, as well as special fault conditions on occasion. The model of induced seismicity is based on the idea of considering a newly-built reservoir as a new infiltration source. It assumes the development of an unsteady flow, with subsequent transmission of hydraulic pressure in the rock mass. This concept is applied in the paper to twenty case histories of the best known reservoirs at which induced seismicity was detected.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Geomechanics of Reservoir Induced Seismicity

St. Louis, Missouri

Although induced seismicity associated with the impounding of reservoirs is a relatively rare phenomenon, it should nevertheless be taken into account, particularly in the design of dams located in aseismic zones. The operation of dams is not significantly affected by induced activities: the main concern arises in situations where unexpected events might affect the behavior of the construction due to soil liquefaction or might affect slope stability. This paper reviews the principal elements which are considered to affect the occurrence of the phenomenon: the weight of the water storage, and the development of pore pressure under the storage. Both elements make differing contributions to the triggering conditions. The occurrence is related to special geological conditions difficult to evaluate but expressed mainly by the presence of brittle rock, as well as special fault conditions on occasion. The model of induced seismicity is based on the idea of considering a newly-built reservoir as a new infiltration source. It assumes the development of an unsteady flow, with subsequent transmission of hydraulic pressure in the rock mass. This concept is applied in the paper to twenty case histories of the best known reservoirs at which induced seismicity was detected.