Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

San Francisco's Southwest Ocean Outfall will extend four miles into the Pacific Ocean. Offshore, the Outfall will cross the San Andreas Fault zone. Major design concerns for the 12-foot inside diameter reinforced concrete pipe included seismic foundation stability, backfill liquefaction, and rupture by fault displacement. Foundation stability was achieved by selection of adequate embedment depths. A coarse pervious backfill to preclude liquefaction-induced pore water pressure gradients was selected based on analyses with the computer program APOLLO. Special joints were designed within and adjacent to the fault zone to limit damage due to fault rupture and to accommodate deformations away from the major fault slip.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Seismic Design of the San Francisco Ocean Outfall

St. Louis, Missouri

San Francisco's Southwest Ocean Outfall will extend four miles into the Pacific Ocean. Offshore, the Outfall will cross the San Andreas Fault zone. Major design concerns for the 12-foot inside diameter reinforced concrete pipe included seismic foundation stability, backfill liquefaction, and rupture by fault displacement. Foundation stability was achieved by selection of adequate embedment depths. A coarse pervious backfill to preclude liquefaction-induced pore water pressure gradients was selected based on analyses with the computer program APOLLO. Special joints were designed within and adjacent to the fault zone to limit damage due to fault rupture and to accommodate deformations away from the major fault slip.