Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

In the evaluation of soil behavior due to earthquake motions, uniform intensity load cycles are frequently used instead of irregular-patterned loadings generated during actual earthquakes. A statistical conversion procedure is discussed in this paper based on results available in the literature. The actual irregular stress-time history produced by an earthquake can be represented by uniform amplitude cyclic stresses, although there may be considerable uncertainty associated with them. The statistical relationship proposed here between the earthquake magnitude and the equivalent uniform stress cycles is somewhat different from the relationship commonly used in practice. It is observed in this study that this discrepancy may not yield significant differences in estimating the soil strength in a liquefaction study. However, this variation should not be overlooked in other soil dynamics problems involving earthquake loading.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Uniform Cycles in Earthquakes: A Statistical Study

St. Louis, Missouri

In the evaluation of soil behavior due to earthquake motions, uniform intensity load cycles are frequently used instead of irregular-patterned loadings generated during actual earthquakes. A statistical conversion procedure is discussed in this paper based on results available in the literature. The actual irregular stress-time history produced by an earthquake can be represented by uniform amplitude cyclic stresses, although there may be considerable uncertainty associated with them. The statistical relationship proposed here between the earthquake magnitude and the equivalent uniform stress cycles is somewhat different from the relationship commonly used in practice. It is observed in this study that this discrepancy may not yield significant differences in estimating the soil strength in a liquefaction study. However, this variation should not be overlooked in other soil dynamics problems involving earthquake loading.