Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

Because the constitutive laws for soils are governed mainly by interparticle friction, all aspects of their mechanical behavior depend strongly on gravitational body forces. This fact poses serious limitations on the formulation of a materially objective soil constitutive theory, based on experimentation performed on earth. In particular, the presence of the earth's gravity prohibits the design of controlled experiments to properly simulate a variety of critical phenomena associated with the dynamic response of soils to seismic excitation in a very low effective confining stress field. For these reasons, the advent of the space age and, more specifically, the capabilities of the Space Shuttle-Spacelab for several day experimentation by trained specialists in a "shirt-sleeve," laboratory- controlled environment, under essentially zero-gravity conditions, could offer invaluable opportunities for developing a quantitative understanding of fundamental aspects of soil behavior during and after an earthquake, which, in turn, could result in significant technological advances in geotechnical earthquake engineering.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

The Potential of In-Space Research on Liquefaction Phenomena and Related Soil Behavior

St. Louis, Missouri

Because the constitutive laws for soils are governed mainly by interparticle friction, all aspects of their mechanical behavior depend strongly on gravitational body forces. This fact poses serious limitations on the formulation of a materially objective soil constitutive theory, based on experimentation performed on earth. In particular, the presence of the earth's gravity prohibits the design of controlled experiments to properly simulate a variety of critical phenomena associated with the dynamic response of soils to seismic excitation in a very low effective confining stress field. For these reasons, the advent of the space age and, more specifically, the capabilities of the Space Shuttle-Spacelab for several day experimentation by trained specialists in a "shirt-sleeve," laboratory- controlled environment, under essentially zero-gravity conditions, could offer invaluable opportunities for developing a quantitative understanding of fundamental aspects of soil behavior during and after an earthquake, which, in turn, could result in significant technological advances in geotechnical earthquake engineering.