Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

A better understanding of soil/rock-structure interaction is invaluable in the seismic design of concrete and masonry structures. In an effort to understand the behavior of rock under cyclic compression, both intact and faulted specimens of Westerly granite (2.5 cm. dia. x 6.25 cm. long) were subjected to uniaxial and triaxial loading at a uniform rate of one cycle per second. The fatigue strength under uniaxial loading at 106 cycles was found to be about 70% of the static compressive strength, and confining pressure improved fatigue resistance considerably. The accumulated permanent strain at the maximum stress level was found to be independent of the stress path and bounded by the complete stress-strain curve. cyclic loading produces dilatancy and the stress at the onset of dilatancy is significantly reduced by repeated cycling. In faulted specimens (saw cut at 30 degrees to the longitudinal axis), the first loading cycle produces a large amount of sliding; subsequent cycles result in a decelerating rate of increase in the amount of sliding, with a steady-state equilibrium being reached in a few cycles. Cyclic loading increases crack porosity, and progressive microcracking causes fatigue failure.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Mechanical Behavior of Granite Under Cyclic Compression

St. Louis, Missouri

A better understanding of soil/rock-structure interaction is invaluable in the seismic design of concrete and masonry structures. In an effort to understand the behavior of rock under cyclic compression, both intact and faulted specimens of Westerly granite (2.5 cm. dia. x 6.25 cm. long) were subjected to uniaxial and triaxial loading at a uniform rate of one cycle per second. The fatigue strength under uniaxial loading at 106 cycles was found to be about 70% of the static compressive strength, and confining pressure improved fatigue resistance considerably. The accumulated permanent strain at the maximum stress level was found to be independent of the stress path and bounded by the complete stress-strain curve. cyclic loading produces dilatancy and the stress at the onset of dilatancy is significantly reduced by repeated cycling. In faulted specimens (saw cut at 30 degrees to the longitudinal axis), the first loading cycle produces a large amount of sliding; subsequent cycles result in a decelerating rate of increase in the amount of sliding, with a steady-state equilibrium being reached in a few cycles. Cyclic loading increases crack porosity, and progressive microcracking causes fatigue failure.