Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

The state of the art is summarized for the evaluation of the stress, strain and strength properties of soils in terms of appropriate test equipment, test procedures and the presentation of test results in both the laboratory and the field. Different testing requirements for measuring soil properties for l) design and analysis problems and 2) for constitutive property modeling are compared and recommendations on minimum test result reporting requirements are given. In addition, methods for overcoming equipment and test procedure limitations are presented. The importance of combining field and laboratory test results is stressed and ways to make more extensive use of geophysical test measurements to obtain insitu soil properties are summarized. On a site specific basis, it appears that geophysical test results may correlate well with many soil index properties and measures of insitu soil dynamic properties. Thus, much useful site information may be obtained by combining a limited geophysical test program and a more extensive traditional site investigation program.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Load, Deformation and Strength Behavior of Soils under Dynamic Loadings

St. Louis, Missouri

The state of the art is summarized for the evaluation of the stress, strain and strength properties of soils in terms of appropriate test equipment, test procedures and the presentation of test results in both the laboratory and the field. Different testing requirements for measuring soil properties for l) design and analysis problems and 2) for constitutive property modeling are compared and recommendations on minimum test result reporting requirements are given. In addition, methods for overcoming equipment and test procedure limitations are presented. The importance of combining field and laboratory test results is stressed and ways to make more extensive use of geophysical test measurements to obtain insitu soil properties are summarized. On a site specific basis, it appears that geophysical test results may correlate well with many soil index properties and measures of insitu soil dynamic properties. Thus, much useful site information may be obtained by combining a limited geophysical test program and a more extensive traditional site investigation program.