Date

11 May 1984, 8:00 am - 10:30 am

Abstract

The case histories of two major compacted embankment dams are analysed with regard to the problem most amenable to reasonings and computations of statistics of averages, the problem of deformations, discussed regarding specific laboratory testing compared with use of generalized correlations. Improved mental models for predictions are proposed. In the earthcore-compacted rockfill section the problem of crest cracking suggests the interest in a significant change of zoned section in the topmost stretch. For the concrete-face rockfill dam it is suggested that one needs a significant revision of instrumentation and monitoring orientation. Both dams behaved extraordinarily well on questions of consequence and served to show that unfavourable observations, if too indirect, lead to no benefit, but may sometimes prove the inexistence of the consequential misbehavior to be guarded against.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Meeting Name

1st Conference of the International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Behavior of Two Big Rockfill Dams, and Design Aims

The case histories of two major compacted embankment dams are analysed with regard to the problem most amenable to reasonings and computations of statistics of averages, the problem of deformations, discussed regarding specific laboratory testing compared with use of generalized correlations. Improved mental models for predictions are proposed. In the earthcore-compacted rockfill section the problem of crest cracking suggests the interest in a significant change of zoned section in the topmost stretch. For the concrete-face rockfill dam it is suggested that one needs a significant revision of instrumentation and monitoring orientation. Both dams behaved extraordinarily well on questions of consequence and served to show that unfavourable observations, if too indirect, lead to no benefit, but may sometimes prove the inexistence of the consequential misbehavior to be guarded against.