Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Coal; Methane; Mining; Ventilation; Combustion; Regenerative; Greenhouse Gas

Abstract

U.S. EPA's coalbed methane outreach program, (CMOP) has prepared a technical assessment of techniques that combust trace amounts of coal mine methane contained in ventilation air. Control of methane emissions from mine ventilation systems has been an elusive goal because of the magnitude of a typical airflow and the very low methane concentrations. One established and cost-effective use feeds the air into a prime mover in lieu of ambient combustion air. This method usually consumes just a fraction of the flow available from each ventilation shaft. The authors evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two emerging systems that may accept up to 100% of the flow from a nearby shaft, oxidize the contained methane, and produce marketable energy. Both systems use regenerative, flow-reversal reactors. One system operates at 1000°C, and the other uses a catalyst to reduce the combustion temperature by several hundred degrees. Above certain minimum methane concentrations the reactors can exchange high quality heat with a working fluid such as compressed air or pressurized water. This paper discusses two illustrative energy projects where the reactors produce energy revenue and greenhouse gas credits and yield an attractive return on invested capital.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Mitigation of Methane Emissions from Coal Mine Ventilation Air

Rolla, MO

U.S. EPA's coalbed methane outreach program, (CMOP) has prepared a technical assessment of techniques that combust trace amounts of coal mine methane contained in ventilation air. Control of methane emissions from mine ventilation systems has been an elusive goal because of the magnitude of a typical airflow and the very low methane concentrations. One established and cost-effective use feeds the air into a prime mover in lieu of ambient combustion air. This method usually consumes just a fraction of the flow available from each ventilation shaft. The authors evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two emerging systems that may accept up to 100% of the flow from a nearby shaft, oxidize the contained methane, and produce marketable energy. Both systems use regenerative, flow-reversal reactors. One system operates at 1000°C, and the other uses a catalyst to reduce the combustion temperature by several hundred degrees. Above certain minimum methane concentrations the reactors can exchange high quality heat with a working fluid such as compressed air or pressurized water. This paper discusses two illustrative energy projects where the reactors produce energy revenue and greenhouse gas credits and yield an attractive return on invested capital.