Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Computational Fluid Dynamics; Diesel Exhaust; Fire Heat Release Rate; Overbuild; Simulations; Transit Station; Tunnel Ventilation

Abstract

Longitudinal ventilation systems in transit and rail tunnels are typically analyzed by one dimensional ventilation network simulation models, such as the Subway Environment Simulation (SES) program. However, in recent years computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been utilized in conjunction with one-dimensional ventilation network programs to study ventilation systems for large volume spaces such as transit stations and rail overbuilds, as well as for vehicular tunnels. CFD uses numerical methods to simulate complex fluid flow phenomena in three dimensions to predict the distribution of velocity, pressure, temperature, concentration, and other relevant variables throughout the volume. This paper presents an overview of CFD study results from emergency ventilation analysis for a transit station and both emergency ventilation and diesel emissions analysis for a rail overbuild.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

CFD Applications in Tunnel Ventilation Analysis

Rolla, MO

Longitudinal ventilation systems in transit and rail tunnels are typically analyzed by one dimensional ventilation network simulation models, such as the Subway Environment Simulation (SES) program. However, in recent years computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been utilized in conjunction with one-dimensional ventilation network programs to study ventilation systems for large volume spaces such as transit stations and rail overbuilds, as well as for vehicular tunnels. CFD uses numerical methods to simulate complex fluid flow phenomena in three dimensions to predict the distribution of velocity, pressure, temperature, concentration, and other relevant variables throughout the volume. This paper presents an overview of CFD study results from emergency ventilation analysis for a transit station and both emergency ventilation and diesel emissions analysis for a rail overbuild.