Title

Self-Perception Theory and Unobtrusively Biased Interactions: A Treatment for Heterosocial Anxiety

Abstract

Assessed the effectiveness of a technique predicated on D. J. Bem's (1972) self-perception theory for reducing heterosocial anxiety in college males. 26 heterosocially anxious (as measured by the Situation Questionnaire), infrequently dating undergraduate males were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a waiting-list-control group. "Real life," pleasant, prearranged social interactions with females produced a highly significant change in self-perceptions concerning anxiety as measured by the Fear of Negative Evaluation Questionnaire, the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale, the Security-Insecurity Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. When Ss later interacted with an attractive female coed in a separate setting, state anxiety was less, and behavioral performance improved on 2 conversational skills. When measured after a 6-mo interval, the reduction in perceived heterosocial anxiety maintained itself and resulted in Ss having a significantly greater number of dates. Results are discussed in terms of self-efficacy and self-regulation and control theory. (24 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Department(s)

Psychological Science

Comments

Frances M. Montgomery published as Frances M. Haemmerlie

Keywords and Phrases

Pleasant Prearranged Heterosexual Social Interactions, Self Perceptions Concerning Heterosexual Anxiety, Male College Students

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

220167

Document Type

Article - Journal

Document Version

Citation

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

Rights

© 1982 American Psychological Association Inc., All rights reserved.


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