Abstract

"The purpose of this paper shall be primarily to show the present day trends in the use of electricity by the residential consumer and the effect of such trends on the design, planning, and operation of the electric distribution system. System planning related to the electric utility is divided into two classes. The first deals with generation. The second deals with distribution from the various load and transmission centers to the customer. This thesis will deal .primarily with studies related to the latter.

Many utility distribution system problems have been brought about by the rapidly increased demands for residential uses of electricity. Some of the factors involved have been the high national economic levels, relaxed credit controls on appliance purchases, a highly competitive appliance market, the incidence of ''heat storms", so called, throughout a good share of the country in 1954 and 1955, and the large volume of urban home developments.

The impact of these factors on electric utility systems throughout the United States has been cause for concern. This concern deals primarily with the effect on future system planning. The purpose of this study will be to present the practical engineering problem of distribution planning and operation, giving consideration to the various factors that affect the residential consumer's use of electricity"--Introduction, page 1.

Advisor(s)

Lovett, I. H.

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

Professional Degree in Electrical Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1956

Pagination

iv, 30 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 28-29).

Geographic Coverage

Kansas City Metropolitan Area (Mo.)

Rights

© 1956 James Wilbur Stephens, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Electric power distribution -- Planning
Electric power distribution -- Design and Construction
Electric power consumption
Consumer behavior

Thesis Number

T 1146

Print OCLC #

9524836

Electronic OCLC #

935951889

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Thesis Location

 
COinS